April, 2015


3
Apr 15

Dumbhack 2015

Rebooted DumbHack last night. Crafting it for the RIM/BlackBerry PlayBook because you get a free one if you submit the app before March 31st. Single room minesweeper clone. Get from the entrance to the exit, here avoid the monsters. High score is how deep in the dungeon you can get (how many successive board you can clear). Every level an additional monster is added to the board.

I plan to expand it from there: adding point scoring mechanism based on tiles cleared, which will encourage the user to “push their luck” and clear more of the board (at the risk of revealing a monster); health points so that you can encounter monsters and not die instantly (also encouraging exploration to find more health); points/coins earned by finding treasures (again, enticing user to completely clear each board).

Also, once I complete the PlayBook version and it’s accepted, I’ll post a version to this site and move it to the iPad using the latest AIR (which appears to have pretty decent performance!).
Rebooted DumbHack last night. Crafting it for the RIM/BlackBerry PlayBook because you get a free one if you submit the app before March 31st. Single room minesweeper clone. Get from the entrance to the exit, here avoid the monsters. High score is how deep in the dungeon you can get (how many successive board you can clear). Every level an additional monster is added to the board.

I plan to expand it from there: adding point scoring mechanism based on tiles cleared, which will encourage the user to “push their luck” and clear more of the board (at the risk of revealing a monster); health points so that you can encounter monsters and not die instantly (also encouraging exploration to find more health); points/coins earned by finding treasures (again, enticing user to completely clear each board).

Also, once I complete the PlayBook version and it’s accepted, I’ll post a version to this site and move it to the iPad using the latest AIR (which appears to have pretty decent performance!).
Rebooted DumbHack last night. Crafting it for the RIM/BlackBerry PlayBook because you get a free one if you submit the app before March 31st. Single room minesweeper clone. Get from the entrance to the exit, here avoid the monsters. High score is how deep in the dungeon you can get (how many successive board you can clear). Every level an additional monster is added to the board.

I plan to expand it from there: adding point scoring mechanism based on tiles cleared, which will encourage the user to “push their luck” and clear more of the board (at the risk of revealing a monster); health points so that you can encounter monsters and not die instantly (also encouraging exploration to find more health); points/coins earned by finding treasures (again, enticing user to completely clear each board).

Also, once I complete the PlayBook version and it’s accepted, I’ll post a version to this site and move it to the iPad using the latest AIR (which appears to have pretty decent performance!).
I keep being drawn to the very original Legend of Zelda. The game’s chunky grid and clockwork logic feels almost puzzle-like. Even though the game is “real-time”, ailment the intervals of each action are so long as to nearly feel turn-based. What if they were?

Well, what is ed it’d kinda feel like a roguelike. Each action by the player moves the game forward, syphilis each action lasting exactly as long as it takes the player to decide. But without the complexity that normally comes with the full set of roguelike verbs.

A zeldalike has three actions at any moment in time: move to an adjacent tile, swing my sword toward an adjacent tile, or use an item. Using an item may result in an attack (bow, magic wand, boomerang). Moving into an adjacent tile occupied by an inanimate object attempts to push it.

In a turn-based scenario, we’re even less concerned with distinguishing between using your sword versus using an item as a sword is just another type of item (whereas in a “real-time” scenario we want to have both at the ready without having to enter a menu).

What it boils down to is that in terms of a touch-based, turn-based game, whenever the user taps a tile on the screen we probably know what his intent is. That means we can have a very simple interface. Tap an open, accessible tile: walk there. Tap a bad guy adjacent to the player: attack him. Tap the tile occupied by the player and you pop open an inventory you can select from.

LoZ also has some other nice constraints: one screen at a time, chunky grid, overworld vs. dungeons. One screen at a time eliminates having to scroll around. The player can see the whole scenario, can plan many moves ahead more easily. The chunky grid provides for a finite number of configurations of the game world, player can recognize common patterns and apply known solutions. And the overworld and dungeon split of the levels provides a nice open spoke-like system.

From roguelikes, we can borrow a procedurally generated world so that no two games are the same, and permadeath, so a game has an end.

Spelunky successfully made an action platformer roguelike. The Binding of Isaac is very much a Robotron / SmashTV (arena shooter?) roguelike with some visual homages to the Legend of Zelda. Right now I’m leaning toward DumbHack being a traditional roguelike with the constraints of the Legend of Zelda.

I’m tackling this by digesting a lot of information fo various Legend of Zelda engines as they’ve already reverse-engineered the original NES game into fixed code and data. Much of the detail doesn’t apply to a turn-based interpretation, but the general structure of the rules is useful.
Rebooted DumbHack last night. Crafting it for the RIM/BlackBerry PlayBook because you get a free one if you submit the app before March 31st. Single room minesweeper clone. Get from the entrance to the exit, here avoid the monsters. High score is how deep in the dungeon you can get (how many successive board you can clear). Every level an additional monster is added to the board.

I plan to expand it from there: adding point scoring mechanism based on tiles cleared, which will encourage the user to “push their luck” and clear more of the board (at the risk of revealing a monster); health points so that you can encounter monsters and not die instantly (also encouraging exploration to find more health); points/coins earned by finding treasures (again, enticing user to completely clear each board).

Also, once I complete the PlayBook version and it’s accepted, I’ll post a version to this site and move it to the iPad using the latest AIR (which appears to have pretty decent performance!).
Rebooted DumbHack last night. Crafting it for the RIM/BlackBerry PlayBook because you get a free one if you submit the app before March 31st. Single room minesweeper clone. Get from the entrance to the exit, here avoid the monsters. High score is how deep in the dungeon you can get (how many successive board you can clear). Every level an additional monster is added to the board.

I plan to expand it from there: adding point scoring mechanism based on tiles cleared, which will encourage the user to “push their luck” and clear more of the board (at the risk of revealing a monster); health points so that you can encounter monsters and not die instantly (also encouraging exploration to find more health); points/coins earned by finding treasures (again, enticing user to completely clear each board).

Also, once I complete the PlayBook version and it’s accepted, I’ll post a version to this site and move it to the iPad using the latest AIR (which appears to have pretty decent performance!).
I keep being drawn to the very original Legend of Zelda. The game’s chunky grid and clockwork logic feels almost puzzle-like. Even though the game is “real-time”, ailment the intervals of each action are so long as to nearly feel turn-based. What if they were?

Well, what is ed it’d kinda feel like a roguelike. Each action by the player moves the game forward, syphilis each action lasting exactly as long as it takes the player to decide. But without the complexity that normally comes with the full set of roguelike verbs.

A zeldalike has three actions at any moment in time: move to an adjacent tile, swing my sword toward an adjacent tile, or use an item. Using an item may result in an attack (bow, magic wand, boomerang). Moving into an adjacent tile occupied by an inanimate object attempts to push it.

In a turn-based scenario, we’re even less concerned with distinguishing between using your sword versus using an item as a sword is just another type of item (whereas in a “real-time” scenario we want to have both at the ready without having to enter a menu).

What it boils down to is that in terms of a touch-based, turn-based game, whenever the user taps a tile on the screen we probably know what his intent is. That means we can have a very simple interface. Tap an open, accessible tile: walk there. Tap a bad guy adjacent to the player: attack him. Tap the tile occupied by the player and you pop open an inventory you can select from.

LoZ also has some other nice constraints: one screen at a time, chunky grid, overworld vs. dungeons. One screen at a time eliminates having to scroll around. The player can see the whole scenario, can plan many moves ahead more easily. The chunky grid provides for a finite number of configurations of the game world, player can recognize common patterns and apply known solutions. And the overworld and dungeon split of the levels provides a nice open spoke-like system.

From roguelikes, we can borrow a procedurally generated world so that no two games are the same, and permadeath, so a game has an end.

Spelunky successfully made an action platformer roguelike. The Binding of Isaac is very much a Robotron / SmashTV (arena shooter?) roguelike with some visual homages to the Legend of Zelda. Right now I’m leaning toward DumbHack being a traditional roguelike with the constraints of the Legend of Zelda.

I’m tackling this by digesting a lot of information fo various Legend of Zelda engines as they’ve already reverse-engineered the original NES game into fixed code and data. Much of the detail doesn’t apply to a turn-based interpretation, but the general structure of the rules is useful.
Rebooted DumbHack last night. Crafting it for the RIM/BlackBerry PlayBook because you get a free one if you submit the app before March 31st. Single room minesweeper clone. Get from the entrance to the exit, here avoid the monsters. High score is how deep in the dungeon you can get (how many successive board you can clear). Every level an additional monster is added to the board.

I plan to expand it from there: adding point scoring mechanism based on tiles cleared, which will encourage the user to “push their luck” and clear more of the board (at the risk of revealing a monster); health points so that you can encounter monsters and not die instantly (also encouraging exploration to find more health); points/coins earned by finding treasures (again, enticing user to completely clear each board).

Also, once I complete the PlayBook version and it’s accepted, I’ll post a version to this site and move it to the iPad using the latest AIR (which appears to have pretty decent performance!).
I keep being drawn to the very original Legend of Zelda. The game’s chunky grid and clockwork logic feels almost puzzle-like. Even though the game is “real-time”, ailment the intervals of each action are so long as to nearly feel turn-based. What if they were?

Well, what is ed it’d kinda feel like a roguelike. Each action by the player moves the game forward, syphilis each action lasting exactly as long as it takes the player to decide. But without the complexity that normally comes with the full set of roguelike verbs.

A zeldalike has three actions at any moment in time: move to an adjacent tile, swing my sword toward an adjacent tile, or use an item. Using an item may result in an attack (bow, magic wand, boomerang). Moving into an adjacent tile occupied by an inanimate object attempts to push it.

In a turn-based scenario, we’re even less concerned with distinguishing between using your sword versus using an item as a sword is just another type of item (whereas in a “real-time” scenario we want to have both at the ready without having to enter a menu).

What it boils down to is that in terms of a touch-based, turn-based game, whenever the user taps a tile on the screen we probably know what his intent is. That means we can have a very simple interface. Tap an open, accessible tile: walk there. Tap a bad guy adjacent to the player: attack him. Tap the tile occupied by the player and you pop open an inventory you can select from.

LoZ also has some other nice constraints: one screen at a time, chunky grid, overworld vs. dungeons. One screen at a time eliminates having to scroll around. The player can see the whole scenario, can plan many moves ahead more easily. The chunky grid provides for a finite number of configurations of the game world, player can recognize common patterns and apply known solutions. And the overworld and dungeon split of the levels provides a nice open spoke-like system.

From roguelikes, we can borrow a procedurally generated world so that no two games are the same, and permadeath, so a game has an end.

Spelunky successfully made an action platformer roguelike. The Binding of Isaac is very much a Robotron / SmashTV (arena shooter?) roguelike with some visual homages to the Legend of Zelda. Right now I’m leaning toward DumbHack being a traditional roguelike with the constraints of the Legend of Zelda.

I’m tackling this by digesting a lot of information fo various Legend of Zelda engines as they’ve already reverse-engineered the original NES game into fixed code and data. Much of the detail doesn’t apply to a turn-based interpretation, but the general structure of the rules is useful.
Trying to get this thing going again. The current version is using Flash/AIR. That’s not necessary for a web game like this, neuropathist and it’s actually a detriment because it won’t work on mobile, overweight where it’d otherwise be totally playable. So, check job #1 is porting the game to Phaser so it’ll be HTML5 native.

I’ve got a long list of ideas for the game, so I’d like this site to become a “history” of the game’s development. Need to find a good way to track previous versions, etc. Latest version will always live at http://dumbhack.com/, but all previous versions would be accessible to. Probably figure out how to just make them as posts, or maybe just save snapshots to folders.

Since the game doesn’t have any animation, I’m guessing porting it to Phaser will be dead simple. It’s literally just one function that takes a tap/click, converts it to tilemap coordinates, then does some very simple logic with the tilemap based on what’s stored in that position. And then there’s the function that generates a tilemap based on the level number. That’s it!

I should toss the source code on github for everyone to check out. May just wait and do that for the first version of Phaser because honestly, I don’t think I even have Flash Builder installed on my home laptop any more, so I probably couldn’t even compile the source! ;-)